Witness Pioneer | Magazine

Index

  Editorial

  Women’s Dignity, Rights and Empowerment in Islam

  Bringing An End to The World of Extremism

  Hypocrisy Versus Reality

  Ruku in Sidney

Editorial

“Women’s Dignity, Rights and Empowerment in
Islam” has come to the ending part. Expecting it to
be able to draw the attention of the society. To
establish a balanced society we all should fight
strongly against the extremism in religious affairs.
“Bringing An End to The World of Extremism” by
Fatima Nasreen Hasan is a summarized extract from
“Islamic Awakening Between Rejection &
Extremism” by Yousuf Al Qaradawi. With intense
pleasure we are congratulating her for joining the
team of “The Window”.
Endless gratitude to Allah (SWT), we are with the 4 th
publication.
Ma As Salam.

Women’s Dignity, Rights and Empowerment in Islam

Shah Abdul Hannan
(Continued from the previous issue)
4. At the time of creation Allah attributed
human beings as Khalifa (Caliph:
representative). He said to His angels, “…. I will
create a vicegerent (Khalifa) on earth…..”[Al Quran
2:30]
Allah did not say that he was sending women
or men. He did not even say that he was sending
human beings. He told that he was sending
representatives. He sent human beings but he
called them representatives. The entire human
being is his representative irrespective of the
sex. But if we disobey Him, commit crime,
commit murder, carry out oppression, and lose
faith in Him then it is obvious that we will lose
our status as Khalifa.[Al Quran 35:39] But basically we
all are His representatives.
The foundation of woman’s empowerment lies
with this status as Khalifa. No one can perform
ones responsibility without power or authority.
In Khilafat lies the foundation of empowerment
of all women, men, poor and weak. So this is the
fourth proof of fundamental equality of men
and women. Islam wants every man and every
woman i.e., each and every person to be
empowered. But as women are deprived now
they should be empowered first. If men are
deprived at anytime they must be empowered.
We must have to think about anyone who is
deprived. At present we must have to put efforts
for the empowerment of women. We must not
confine women within our home. We must let
them come forward. If any woman freely
decides to stay at home, she of course has rights
to do that. But Almighty Allah has never said
anywhere that women will have to stay at home
and will not be able to do anything outside.
There is no legal provision in either the Quran
or the Sunnah of the Prophet (SAWS) which
prohibits women from seeking a career or a job.
On the contrary He has assigned both men and
women with some responsibilities. In a verse of
Surah Tawba Allah says:
“The Believers, men and women, are protectors,
one of another: they enjoin what is just, and
forbid what is evil: they observe regular
prayers, practice regular charity, and obey
Allah and His Messenger……”
[Al Quran 9:71]
In this verse Allah says that men and women are
the Wali (guardians) of one another. By this
verse Allah has given women the right of being
guardians of men also. Through these
instructions Allah has accredited the
participation of women in all good activities. He
declares that He will shower blessings on those
who will perform these responsibilities. So I
express my firm belief that all men and women
are equal as far as these six responsibilities are
concerned. All activities including politics and
social work fall within its purview.

Bringing An End to The World of Extremism

Fatima Nasreen Hasan.
Islam is the clear straight path, which
recommends moderation and balance in every
thing: in brief, Ibadah, conduct and legislation.
Allah calls this path ‘Al Sirat Al Mustaqim’, one
distinct from all others. It is important to point
out that moderation or balance is not only a
general characteristic of Islam but also a
fundamental landmark. The Quran states:
“Thus have we made of you an Ummah justly
balanced that ye might be witnesses over the
nations and the Messenger a witness over
yourselves….” [2:143].
Reading the above verse one might realize the
significance of a balanced Ummah . The word
balance simply means neither too little nor too
much (i.e., excessiveness) but something in
between the two. So in order to be on the right
path we would have to oppose all the extremism.
In the following discussion we would look at the
concepts of religious extremism.
Literally, extremism means being situated at the
farthest possible point from the center.
Figuratively, it indicates a similar remoteness in
religion and thought, as well as behavior. It is
clear that failure to define and comprehend
religious extremism and to leave the issue t o the
whimsical desires of people will lead to discord
among Muslims. The Quran states: “If the truth
has been in accord with their desires, truly the
heavens and the earth and all the beings therein
would have been in confusion and corruption”.
Here importance should be drawn to two
observations. First: The degree of a person’s
piety as well as that of the society in which lives
affect his judgement of others as far as
extremism, moderation and laxity are
concerned. A religious society usually pr oduces
a person of sensitivity opposite to that of
deviation or negligence. On the other hand, one
who is brought up in an environment, which
neglects Shariah, will consider even minimal
adherence to Islam a kind of extremism. Some
Muslims, who are influenced by alien ideologies
and practices, consider the call for the
application of Shariah and the establishment of
an Islamic state as a sign of ‘religious
extremism’. To such a person, a young man with
beard or a young woman with Hijab, are both
extremists!
Second: It is unfair to assure a person of
religious extremism simply because he has
adopted a ‘grand-line’ juristic opinion of certain
Fuqaha. As for example Ibn Abbas (one of the
companions of the Prophet) facilitated religious
matters while Ibn Umar was strict.
There are mainly three kinds of extremism:
Ghuluw(excessiveness), Tanattu (transgressing
meticulous religiosity) and Tashdid (strictness).
[Based on ‘ Islamic Awakening Between Rejection &
Extremism’ by Yousuf Al Qaradawi.]
[To be continued]

Hypocrisy Versus Reality

Don’t be fooled by my mask. Here what I am
not saying!
Don’t be fooled by me. Don’t be fooled by the
mask I wear. I wear a thousand masks, mask
I’m afraid to take off, and none of them is me.
Pretending is an art that is second nature with
me, but don’t be fooled.
I give the impression that I am secured, that all
is sunny and unruffled with me, within as well
as without; that confidence is my name and
coolness is my game; that the waters are calm
and that I’m in command and I need no one.
But don’t believe it; please don’t.
My surface may seem smooth, but my surface is
my mask, my ever-varying and ever concealing
mask. Beneath lies no smugness, no coolness, no
complacence. Beneath dwells the real me, in
confusion, in fear, in loneliness. But I hide this; I
don’t want anybody to know it. I panic at the
thought of my weakness being exposed. That’s
why I frantically create a mask to hide behind, a
nonchalant sophisticated facade to help me
pretend, to shield me from the glance that
knows. But such a glance is precisely my
salvation. It’s the only thing that can liberate me
from myself, from my own self–built prison
walls, from the barriers that I so painstakingly
erect. But I don’t tell you this. I don’t dare. I am
afraid to.
I’m afraid your glance will not be followed by
love and acceptance. I’m afraid that you will
think less of me, that you’ll laugh, and your
SADADASDASDAS
Laugh will kill me. I’m afraid that deep down
inside I’m nothing, that I’m just no good, and
that you’ll see and reject me. So I play my
games, my desperate, pretending games, with a
façade of assurance on the outside and a
trembling child within.
I’d really like to be genuine, spontaneous and
me; but you have to help me. You have to help
me by holding out your hand, even when that’s
the last thing I seem to want or need. Each time
you are kind and gentle and encouraging, each
time you try to understand because you really
care, my heart begins to grow wings. Very small
wings. Very feeble wings. But wings. With your
sensitivity and sympathy and your power of
understanding, I can make it. You can breathe
life into me. It will not be easy for you. A long
conviction of worthlessness builds strong walls.
But love is stronger than strong walls, and
therein lies my hope. Please try to beat down
those walls with firm hands, but with gentle
hands, for a child is very sensitive, and I AM a
child.
Who am I, you may wonder? I am someone you
know very well. For I am every man, every
woman, every child……..every human being you
meet.
[Source: Training Guide for Islamic Workers, IIIT]

Ruku in Sidney

This is a recently discovered phenomenon in a
forest near Sidney. The bottom half of a tree
trunk is bowed in such a way that it resembles a
person in a posture of Islamic prayer-the
‘Ruku’. The ‘hands’ are resting on the knees.
The most amazing thing is the ‘man’ is directly
facing the Holy Kaaba in Mecca, which is the
direction makes you think. Does it not?